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Esperanto for histones: CENP-A, not CenH3, is the centromeric histone H3 variant.

Earnshaw WC, Allshire RC, Black BE, Bloom K, Brinkley BR, Brown W, Cheeseman IM, Choo KH, Copenhaver GP, Deluca JG, Desai A, Diekmann S, Erhardt S, Fitzgerald-Hayes M, Foltz D, Fukagawa T, Gassmann R, Gerlich DW, Glover DM, Gorbsky GJ, Harrison SC, Heun P, Hirota T, Jansen LE, Karpen G, Kops GJ, Lampson MA, Lens SM, Losada A, Luger K, Maiato H, Maddox PS, Margolis RL, Masumoto H, McAinsh AD, Mellone BG, Meraldi P, Musacchio A, Oegema K, O'Neill RJ, Salmon ED, Scott KC, Straight AF, Stukenberg PT, Sullivan BA, Sullivan KF, Sunkel CE, Swedlow JR, Walczak CE, Warburton PE, Westermann S, Willard HF, Wordeman L, Yanagida M, Yen TJ, Yoda K, Cleveland DW

Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JR, Scotland, UK, bill.earnshaw@ed.ac.uk.

The first centromeric protein identified in any species was CENP-A, a divergent member of the histone H3 family that was recognised by autoantibodies from patients with scleroderma-spectrum disease. It has recently been suggested to rename this protein CenH3. Here, we argue that the original name should be maintained both because it is the basis of a long established nomenclature for centromere proteins and because it avoids confusion due to the presence of canonical histone H3 at centromeres.

Chromosome Res. 2013;21(2):101-6.

Pubmed ID: 23580138

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